Sunday, November 23, 2014

Rich Hill Mining Review Feb. 8 1990 {A fitting farewell to Corey Gordon}

{A fitting farewell to Corey Gordon}-In Tribute

Feb.8 1990
By Randy Bell
  A police car headed west on Rich Hill's Walnut Street with the fire engine not far behind. It was shortly before noon on Friday.
  Foggy, damp, cold, a little drizzle, a miserable day to fight a fire. That thought crossed my mind as I climbed into my car, camera in hand.
  But this day there would be no fire. No smoke to breath, no soot to stain face and clothes, no long lines of hoses to roll back up. Granted many firemen and ex-firemen were close at hand but this time they would not be grabbing for helmets, boots and yellow overcoats, they were dressed in suits and ties.
  This day they had come to honor the passing of longtime Rich Hill Fire Chief Corey Gordon. It was a fitting final salute to this veteran of 38 years of fire fighting that the fire truck led his funeral procession, that fellow firemen were his casket bearers.
  All my life I had watched Corey Gordon leading the Fourth of July parades and bringing Santa Claus to town in the fire truck. But it wasn't until I came back to work at the Review that I really became acquainted with Corey.
  As memory serves, Corey was at one of the first city council meetings I attended as a reporter back in 1972. By then Corey had already served 30 years on the volunteer fire department. He was asking, that night, that the council start putting aside some funds for the purchase of a new fire truck. After the meeting he mentioned to me that a new fire truck wasn't a necessity right then, but that sooner or later it would be and the cost would be higher.
  Over the next eight years our paths, Corey's and mine, would often cross. As smoke billowed from some upstairs window Corey would direct his firemen and I'd snap pictures. Later we'd get together and he'd give me details for the story.
  But there was much more to the story than the story. The fires made headlines, but the untold hours made the fire department. Hours of training, of taking care of equipment, paperwork, inspections, of fire prevention efforts — those hours were seldom glorious or exciting and seldom made the news. But your home, your very life was a little safer for each of them.
  Next to his family, fire protection for our town was the most important factor in Corey's life. In fact that devotion often took Corey away from his family, sometimes in the dead of night, sometimes in the heat, sometimes in the cold, sometimes during a holiday dinner. Fires are never convenient.
  But year after year Corey was there. When it came to durable devotion he set an example for the rest of us.
  And Corey, if you happen to be listening, that new fire truck will be arriving in town in the next couple of weeks. When I snap a picture of it, I'll be thinking of you.

Saturday, November 22, 2014

The tribune., August 01, 1901

The Rich Hill Tribune

The Rich Hill Tribune began publication in 1890 as a weekly four-page paper, appearing each Thursday and covering news from Rich Hill and Bates County, Missouri . The publishers and editors were J. Claud Oldham and Robert E. Pritchard. Ownership of the paper changed in 1900 to George F. Huckeby and Perezza A. Pritchard, and the name changed to the Tribune.
Pritchard left the paper in December of 1902, and Nannie R. Huckeby joined the editorial staff. The December 18, 1902 issue states: "For her long and faithful work in the mechanical part of the office, my associate Nannie R. Huckeby joins us in the business management of the paper, and any favors shown her, will receive our entire and unqualified endorsement."
On January 1, 1903, the paper's name changed back to the Rich Hill Tribune, expanding to eight pages with George P. and Nannie R. Huckeby as publishers and editors.
The Rich Hill Tribune began its sixteenth volume with the September 7, 1905 issue in which the paper advertised a contest to increase readership and to collect past due notices: "We are now for the first time making an effort to extend and increase our circulation and shall be glad to have our friends help us by paying subscriptions to any one of the twenty-five young ladies who are soliciting subscriptions in our voting contest, thereby helping them to win a valuable prize while they favor us with their subscriptions. If you owe back subscriptions, hand it to them and thus give them so many votes toward getting at least one of the prizes offered. If your subscription is paid up, one dollar will extend your subscription one year and help the young lady in her effort and you will get the worth of your money in the paper."
The details and rules of the contest took up most of page 4 of the newspaper with the heading "NOW ON-The Tribune's Big and Popular Piano Contest": first prize offered to the winner would be "a fine first class Straube Piano-valued at $400." The contest ended with the announcement of the winner: "Miss Julia Dubach Gets The Handsome Piano." The contest was a huge success, and the Tribunewas "satisfied with the result. What we expected was subscribers and we got them; and a large number of back subscriptions collected at no greater rate than it would have cost us through an adjustment agency. The Tribune is not going out of business as a result of the contest either, but has just ordered a supply of new paper."
On June 6, 1907, after George P. Huckeby was appointed postmaster at Rich Hill, Claude A. Brown joined the Tribune as manager and editor and was there until September of that year. Although Huckeby tried to continue running the paper, on January 2, 1908, he issued his "Retiring Statement," explaining that the “management of the Tribune changes with this issue. Finding it impossible to do justice to the paper and give the attention demanded by the post office department to the duties of the post master, we have turned the Tribune over to Mr. George B. Dowell, a young man brought up in a printing office, and well qualified both by education and practical knowledge of the business to make the paper a success. The general policy of the paper will not be changed, politically, morally, or socially....Mr. Dowell is the son of the popular mayor of Adrian, editor of the Adrian Journal and comes to us highly spoken of by all who know him, thus leaving the paper in the hands of just such a successor as we have been looking for. We retire from the management of the Tribune with no animosities, and with good wishes for all. Huckeby and Huckeby.”
On June 24, 1909, Albert Matteson and Luther Fry assumed management of the paper. Both men had been with the Tribuneduring the eighteen months it was published by Dowell.
The Rich Hill Tribune ceased publication in early 1911.
Provided by: State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Mary S. Northrup Obit-Rich Hill Mining Review Sept.1984

Mary S. Northrup 96,of Rich Hill.Missouri, died on Thursday, August 30, 1984 at Medicalodge Nursing Home, Butler, Missouri where she had been a patient for the last 12 years.
Mary was born on September 29, 1887 at Tooele, Utah, the daughter of John Gillespie and Elizabeth Whitelock, Stewart.
On September 29,1910 Mary was united in marriage to Roy L. Northup and to this union two sons were born, one son, Roy Richard was killed October 24, 1944 while serving his county in the Army in World War II.
Mary had lived in Rich Hill, Missouri for 40 years. She owned and managed the Northrup Drug Store for many years until her retirement in 1964. She was very active in the V.F.D. and the America Legion and other civic affairs.
She was a member of the Presbyterian Church.
Besides her son, she was preceded in death by her husband, Roy who passed away in 1944 two brothers and two sisters.
Mary is survived by a son, Jack Northrup of Lee's Summit, Missouri, two Grandchildren and two Great Grandchildren, nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held Saturday September 1, 1984 at 2:00 p.m. from the Underwood-Steinbeck Chapel, Rich Hill, Missouri with Charles Rhodes officiating, Interment was made in Green Lawn Cemetery, Rich Hill, Missouri.
Mrs. Pauline Underwood organist played selections of "Ave Maria" and "The Old Rugged Cross"' Those serving as casket bears were: Herb McDaniel, Paul Droz, Jim Wheatley, Harry Poulter, Fred Marquardt and Harland Swope.
Services and interment were under the direction of  Underwood-Steinbeck Funeral Home, Rich Hill Missouri.
  

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Mid Continent Building at 8th and Park


Rich Hill, Missouri
Mid Continent Building
I would say sometime in the 1960'S

Monday, November 17, 2014

Rich Hill Mining Review -{Fall 1984}

McElroys becomes Hoepner Feed&Grain

On September 24 MeElroy Feed and Grain became Hoeper Feed and Grain with Terry and Dixie Hoeper the new owners.
Both Terry and Dixie are familiar faces to the Rich Hill area.Terry is a 1968 graduate of Nevada High School but lived on the family farm west of Rich Hill for the last 11 years. During those years he has been engaged in grain brokerage and farming.
Terry and Dixie were married 9 years ago.Dixie is a 1971 graduate of Rich Hill and grew up in the Sprague area, the daughter of Mr. Marvin Kenney.
Both will be working in the business. Terry as truck dispatcher and manger and Dixie as bookkeeper.
The couple purchased the Elevator because we needed the room to better handle the products we deal in white corn and oats,we needed the facility to work from,"said Terry
Expansion plans are already underway and scheduled to be done by June 15 including the addition of another elevator leg that will allow them to move 4000 bushels of grain move per hour.Also more storge 70,000 bushels more, for white corn is planned.
"We want to get farmers to book acres,instead of bushels, of white corn on contracts with Quaker Oats"said Hoeper.
Hoeper Feed and grain also offer a line of livestock feeds and supplements along with barbed and hog wire and steel fence posts.
Hoeper Feed and Grain is located on old 71 highway south.



Saturday, August 23, 2014

Negro Leagues history in Bates County Missouri

Dixon discusses Negro Leagues history in Bates County Missouri
Phil Dixon, co-founder of the Negro League Baseball Museum, was at Bates County Museum in Robertson Hall to present a program about the legendary Kansas City Monarchs Baseball team.  In 1924, the Monarchs claimed a Championship title and Phil Dixon is attempting to present programs about every game the team played during that year. August 23rd, in the year 1923, the Kansas City Monarchs traveled to Rich Hill to play ball!



The museum was thrilled to host this important presentation and was great to hear what Phil had discovered about the Rich Hill game as well as learn more about the incomparable Kansas City Monarchs.
His program was  about a 45 minute power presentation with historic photographs, entertaining stories and colorful baseball poetry. Following the program the museum  hosted a free will offering luncheon complete with a traditional baseball park menu: Hot Dogs with all the fixin’s, nachos, soda pop, and ice cream.

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Richard R. Northup Dog tags


Web site were I found Richard Northurp Dog tag

Some of the most intriguing items on the group are the dogtags that were on an old piece of wire when I got the group. 

Two of the dogtags are from men of the 60th CA , who died on the Japanese Hellship Arisan Maru ( Robert Nail and Roy Northrup ) in 1944 . The circular dogtag is made out of a coin and has a " T-42 " date on the back. It belonged to EM3c Emmett Lee Kilmer of the USS Canopus who was liberated in Manchuria at the end of the War . The final tag belonged to Major Reginald H Ridgely of the 4th Marines on Corregidor . He also survived the war and attained General rank in the USMC . I do not know how Chaplain Borneman came into possession of the tags. They all have a great deal of wear , corrosion, and some are bent. They were all on an old wire when I got them in his effects.

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Picture from the David Wright Collection


Got these Pictures at Rich Hill Alumni {David Wright Collection} 





Friday, June 20, 2014

Tom Perry and the 1968 Rich Hill baseball team

Rich Hill 1968 baseball team,
Got this picture from Tom Perry Facebook thanks Tom
Front, Kenny Ison, Danny Detienne, Tim Breckinridge, Tom Perry, Steve Landon, Kenny Vail. Back Row: Eric Nichols, Kip Linard, Steve Schofield, Dude Breckinridge, Tom Breckinridge, Chris Vail, Coach Larry Wilson, — in Rich Hill, MO.

Friday, June 13, 2014

Groundbreaking on the new Safe Room {6-13-14}

Groundbreaking on the new Safe Room {6-13-14}
Rich Hill Missouri




Saturday, May 24, 2014

Civil War veterans form GAR Post Wagon Wheels,August 14 1986

      Wagon Wheels,                                                       August 14, 1986 by: Mary Griffin
     
                     Civil War veterans form GAR Post 
 
     When Rich Hill was being settled twenty years after the Civil War, settlers from both the Union and the Con federate armies moved into this city. Veterans who had fought under the stars and stripes soon became acquainted with one another. Before long they decided to meet and draw up a petition for a GAR post here in Rich Hill.
     It was not long until the charter came through from the Department of Missouri, St. Louis, stipulating that the local organization would be known as General Canby Post No. 10 of the Department of Missouri, Grand Army of the Republic. Many of the people who were charter members were pioneers in the settlement of Rich Hill and continued to live here the rest of their lives.
     These veterans knew that the organization had first been formed in 1865-66 in Illinois by Major Benjamin F. Stephenson, surgeon and Rev. J. Rutledge, Chaplin both of the 14th Infantry. This organization was so popular that within the next twenty years that membership reached more than half a million.
     Each year the GAR held an annual encampment in different cities of the north. In 1883 the GAR held their encampment in Baltimore, Maryland. It was there that the organization gained national recognition. In 1885 more than thirty thousand marched in their parade in Portland, Maine. But by 1930 only twenty-one thousand names remained on the roll.
     In 1948 the Encampment was held at Grand Rapids, Michigan, with only five veterans marching in the parade. It was then that they decided that this would be the last Encampment and singing of "Tenting on the Old Camp Grounds" while this organization no longer exists, the memory still lingers among descendants of that war.
     The Rich Hill directory of 1883 gave information on the General Canby Post No. 10 GAR. The meeting for organi zation was held at McElroy's Hall located on the east side of sixth street between Walnut and Park Avenue. The directory also lists the following as the First Official Family of the local organization of the G.A.R.: S. G. Higgins,. Post Commander; R. H. Dale, Senior Vice Commander; J. B. Williams, Junior Vice Commander; S. B. Cole, Quarter master; George B. Huckeby, Adjutant; D.W.C. O'Neill, Chaplin; H. C. Jones, Officer of Guard; W. W. Wolfe, Officer of the Day; John W. Snider, Quarter master Sergeant; and John W. Scott, Sergeant Major.
     Canby Post No. 10 GAR lasted more than forty years locally and it is estimated that more than 300 members had joined the local post. The last two members were A. B. Henderson and J.  I. Brooks.
I recall that Mr. J. I. Brooks always had some one to place flags on the graves of veterans for Memorial Day.

The National tribune., April 03, 1884, Page 6, Image 6







Thursday, May 22, 2014

The Rich Hill Tribune Rich Hill, Missouri Thursday, May 22, 1902

 High School commencement
The Rich Hill high School commencement exercises were eminently creditable to all engaged in them,from the invocation to the closing exercise.
"The Shadow Song"was rendered in Mrs. J.M Johanners best style which is only another way of saying it pleased everyone.
The salutatory ,"The path of glory in America," by Miss Mary Mattingly, was well delivered and well received by the audience.
Miss Blanch Edith Rhodes essay,"Self Made if Ever Made"was so true that everybody saw the point and it was a pleasing production.
"Life's Dream," rendered by the M.F.M. Quartet was an excellent piece of music sung in an excellent piece of music.Sung in an excellent manner by a club quartet that reflects credit upon the community in the excellent way in which they do things.
Miss Alta Matteson's Valedictory ,"Influence of Associates,"Was an elegant production by one of Rich Hill's best young ladies.
The Piano Solo by Prof. Kimbrough was delightful to lovers of music.
Rev.W.T. Pyles address was appropriate excellent and appreciated by the audience.The presentation of diplomas was then made by F.H. Chevertoo,President of the School Board.
The closing item on the program.In the hour of softening Splendor, was splendidly rendered by a quartet,misses Lutie Winchell, Gertrude Cheverton,Florence Slater and Maggie Hughed
Every went off smoothly and to the satisfaction of all under the splendid management of Prof S.M. Barret and his associates.





Sunday, May 18, 2014

Redwood log Cabin's advertisement from the Rich Hill Daily Review Newspaper

Old advertisement from Rich Hill Daily Review Newspaper 


Saturday, May 17, 2014

Rich Hill Gas Works Part 2

This is part 2 of Rich Hill Gas works Part 1 can be seen here at Rich Hill Gas part 1
From
History of Rich Hill, Missouri From: History of Bates County, Missouri
By: W. O. Atkeson
Historical Publishing Company
Topeka - Cleveland 1918


The development and utilization of natural gas had been made a success, temporarily, at least, at Ft. Scott, and Colonel Irish conceived the idea of prospecting for natural gas in the interest of Rich Hill as it was known to exist in many of the deeper wells in Howard and New Home townships and had been troublesome in the entries in the different mining shafts west of the city; and he set about to secure a franchise for furnishing Rich Hill with natural gas and ultimately secured a very liberal franchise, with the privilege of putting in an artificial gas plant; and failed to find, after prospecting, a sufficient amount and requisite pressure of the natural gas to be successfully utilized. He did the prospecting west of the city and penetrated the gas strata but the pressure was not sufficiently strong to be of use for the. purposes required. Thereupon he installed an artificial gas plant, costing thirty thousand dollars and operated the same for several years, purchasing in the meantime the electric light plant. A few years later when on a business trip to St. Louis he met the Garrisons and learned they desired to sell their water plant at Rich Hill and figuring out that the three plants could be operated together to advantage and with economy, he negotiated for the purchase of the water works plant at a cost of seventy five thousand dollars, and consolidated the three companies under the name of the Rich Hills Water, Light and Fuel Company and as president and general manager of the company, operated them successfully for three or four years when he had a vision of Rich Hill's decline and sold and transferred all but a few shares of the stock to a St. Louis syndicate of capitalists and resigned as president and general manager. Several years after this the city of Rich Hill acquired all the interests of the company.



                              This is from the American Gas Light Journal, Volume 53 July 14 1890



Wednesday, March 12, 2014

the Rich Hill Pool Hall


December 6,1979 Wagon Wheels edition of the Rich Hill Mining Review
The Smith Pool Hall has been a family business since 1941 when Dalph and Hazel Smith started it. The Pool Hall was passed on to Orben and Margaret, to Earl and Gjra Lee and now Ora Lee and Clifford operate the Smith Pool Hall. Needless to say this has been a favorite place for men who want to enjoy a game of pool.

Sunday, March 9, 2014

Danny and Willa Ellis

Source  The Ellis Foundation -http://www.theellisfoundation.org/ellis-community/the-ellis-family/
Danny and Willa Ellis, Danny and Willa grew up in Rich Hill, Missouri. These high school sweethearts have spent the last 60 years as successful business partners and have applied their entrepreneurial expertise to their non-profit work.
Danny and Willa Ellis were profoundly impacted by their daughter’s influence on her students. During the year after Kathy’s passing, they offered three scholarships in Fort Scott, Kansas, in her memory. They immediately saw a tremendous need for scholarship assistance, as well as a mentoring program directed towards results.
Danny and Willa retired from active work with the foundation in 2011, but they continue to serve on the Board of Directors. They continue to provide endowment support for the foundation and scholarship assistance to students in Fort Scott, Kansas and Rich Hill, Missouri.
2nd Source-Google news
The Fort Scott Tribune - Apr 23, 1984

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

"The Case of Couch and Meredith"

Bart
Got the book back from the printers. Thanks again for your assistance.

"The Case of Couch and Meredith" chronicles the 1938 crime spree of St. Louis desperadoes John Couch and James Otis Meredith.  They were unemployed and decided to  head out on a road trip, holding up gas stations and taverns along the way when they needed more funds.  Things got out of hand after they car-jacked several people and crossed several state lines. Their activities caught the attention of the FBI, who at he time thought these crimes were being committed by Floyd Hamilton and Huron Ted Walters who were also on the run in the Midwest and happened to be No. 1 and No. 2 on the "Most Wanted List." They made it as far south as Dallas-Forth Worth and as far north as Effie, Minnesota, within 100 miles of the Canadian border before being captured.

As part of their 1938 crime spree, John Couch and James Otis Meredith held up the Skelly station in Rich Hill, The gas station and Red Onion Cafe in Harrisonville, and car-jacked Robert Kalousek of Greenwood.

The book is $14.95 with free shipping. If any of your blog followers are interested, they can find the book at Amazon:
ht
redith-Mark-Anderson/dp/0615852092

Thanks!

Mark Anderson
Bemidji, Minnesota





Sunday, February 23, 2014

Frank Ralston Obit from the Rich Hill Mining Review Feb.2 1967

Frank Ralston 
Dead at 86

Frank E. Ralston one of Rich Hill's best known and highly respected citizens died unexpectedly about 8 o'clock Sunday morning, Jan 28, 1967 in his room at the Oakes Hotel in Excelsior Springs, Mo. where he had been living the past five years. Death was apparently caused by a heart attack.

Mr. Ralston was born in Rich Hill, October 28, 1880, the son of James and Hannah Ralston. He grew to young manhood here and received his education in the Rich Hill schools. He was employed by the Beasley Mercantile company many years before his appointment in 1927 as Missouri State Oil Inspector. He  traveled  through Missouri several  years  discharging  the duties of this office.  June 6, 1904, at Rich Hill, he was united in marriage to Elisabeth Maurer, who preceded him death in 1938. During the time Mr. Ralston was employed by the State of Missouri, he and Mrs. Ralston lived at the Dixon Hotel in Kansas City, but always maintained their home in Rich Hill, and at every opportunity spent their time here.

Following  Mr. Ralston's  retirement he returned to Rich Hill and again became active in civic, social and religious  circles of the town. He was proud of his home town and for number of  years  wrote, a column for the Mining Review concerning early day activities here, and at every opportunity gave of his time and resources for every worthwhile project in the town, also helping with publicity to make the project possible.   He was  faithful member of  the Presbyterian  church. Although Mr. Ralston  had been in Excelsior Springs the past  five  years  he still claimed Rich Hill as his home. He was a member of the B.P.O.Elks and during the  time he lived here planned  that  all Elks attend  Mothers Day services at a local church.

Surviving are one niece, Mrs. A.H. Dixon, Excelsior Spring, Mo. ;two nephews, Dr. H. V.  Guhleman,  Jefferson City Mo. And Lt. Col. J. H. Scrivner, Jr. an instructor in the United States Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo.

The  body was brought to Rich Hill for burial in Green Lawn cemetery,  and services were held in the Booth Chapel at 1 o'clock Tuesday afternoon conducted by Rev. Allen Jones, pastor of the Methodist church.
Pallbearers were F. C. "Toppy" Clark, George Holler, Robert Bums, Raymond Mor gan, Hubert Kienberger, and Edwin Lyons.
Mrs. Paul Stevener and Mrs. Marion Moreland vocalists, were accompanied by Mrs. Delmar Vogt at the organ

Monday, February 17, 2014

1967 Rich Hill Commencement

Dyanna Bain-Albert Found this old Rich Hill Graduation program in some old papers from 1967




All Missouri State Offices Political and Military Records, 1919 - 1920 Results

GIVEN NAME:C. J.
SURNAME:Allen
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:physician
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:J. T.
SURNAME:Baker
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:justice of the peace
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:N. W.
SURNAME:Ballfinch
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:clerk
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:E. E.
SURNAME:Bean
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:704
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
PAPER:Mining Review
GIVEN NAME:E. E.
SURNAME:Follin
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:street commissioner
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:William
SURNAME:Fritz
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:alderman
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:Alva
SURNAME:Gordon
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:superintendent water & light plant
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:R. E.
SURNAME:Hoover
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:justice of the peace
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:J. F.
SURNAME:Isley
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:alderman
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:S. J.
SURNAME:Jamison
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:postmaster
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:Dan
SURNAME:Lowery
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:marshal & night police
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:Richard
SURNAME:March
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:alderman
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:J. J.
SURNAME:Martin
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:justice of the peace
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:L. W.
SURNAME:Mathews
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:704
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
PAPER:Western Enterprise
GIVEN NAME:H. E.
SURNAME:Sheppard
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:acting attorney
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:W. V. (Dr.)
SURNAME:Smith
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:mayor
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:Jake
SURNAME:Thomas
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:justice of the peace
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill
GIVEN NAME:Albert
SURNAME:Wiek
COUNTY:Bates
PAGE:316
POSITION:alderman
CITY/TOWN:Rich Hill

Sunday, February 16, 2014

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Roy Richard Northrup Born Feb 5,1920-Died Oct 24 1944

         This Memorial is at the Rich Hill Grade School Flag Pole

POW Transport Ship:October Sinking: Arisan Maru, 24 October 1944

http://www.us-japandialogueonpows.org/Bowen.htm



Tuesday, February 11, 2014

The Tribune and The Rich Hill Tribune

 The Rich Hill Tribune

The Rich Hill Tribune began publication in 1890 as a weekly four-page paper, appearing each Thursday and covering news from Rich Hill and Bates County, Missouri . The publishers and editors were J. Claud Oldham and Robert E. Pritchard. Ownership of the paper changed in 1900 to George F. Huckeby and Perezza A. Pritchard, and the name changed to the Tribune.
Pritchard left the paper in December of 1902, and Nannie R. Huckeby joined the editorial staff. The December 18, 1902 issue states: “For her long and faithful work in the mechanical part of the office, my associate Nannie R. Huckeby joins us in the business management of the paper, and any favors shown her, will receive our entire and unqualified endorsement. “
On January 1, 1903, the paper’s name changed back to the Rich Hill Tribune, expanding to eight pages with George P. and Nannie R. Huckeby as publishers and editors.
The Rich Hill Tribune began its sixteenth volume with the September 7, 1905 issue in which the paper advertised a contest to increase readership and to collect past due notices: “We are now for the first time making an effort to extend and increase our circulation and shall be glad to have our friends help us by paying subscriptions to any one of the twenty-five young ladies who are soliciting subscriptions in our voting contest, thereby helping them to win a valuable prize while they favor us with their subscriptions. If you owe back subscriptions, hand it to them and thus give them so many votes toward getting at least one of the prizes offered. If your subscription is paid up, one dollar will extend your subscription one year and help the young lady in her effort and you will get the worth of your money in the paper.”
The details and rules of the contest took up most of page 4 of the newspaper with the heading “NOW ON-The Tribune’s Big and Popular Piano Contest”: first prize offered to the winner would be “a fine first class Straube Piano – valued at $400.” The contest ended with the announcement of the winner: “Miss Julia Dubach Gets The Handsome Piano.” The contest was a huge success, and the Tribunewas “satisfied with the result. What we expected was subscribers and we got them; and a large number of back subscriptions collected at no greater rate than it would have cost us through an adjustment agency. The Tribune is not going out of business as a result of the contest either, but has just ordered a supply of new paper.”
On June 6, 1907, after George P. Huckeby was appointed postmaster at Rich Hill, Claude A. Brown joined the Tribune as manager and editor and was there until September of that year. Although Huckeby tried to continue running the paper, on January 2, 1908, he issued his “Retiring Statement,” explaining that the “management of the Tribune changes with this issue. Finding it impossible to do justice to the paper and give the attention demanded by the post office department to the duties of the post master, we have turned the Tribune over to Mr. George B. Dowell, a young man brought up in a printing office, and well qualified both by education and practical knowledge of the business to make the paper a success.
The general policy of the paper will not be changed, politically, morally, or socially….Mr. Dowell is the son of the popular mayor of Adrian, editor of the Adrian Journal and comes to us highly spoken of by all who know him, thus leaving the paper in the hands of just such a successor as we have been looking for. We retire from the management of the Tribune with no animosities, and with good wishes for all. Huckeby and Huckeby.”
On June 24, 1909, Albert Matteson and Luther Fry assumed management of the paper. Both men had been with the Tribuneduring the eighteen months it was published by Dowell.
The Rich Hill Tribune ceased publication in early 1911.